Connecticut Judicial Branch Law Libraries   Books

Connecticut Law About Powers of Attorney
These links connect to resources available and are provided with the understanding
that they represent only a starting point for research.

External Link - You are leaving the Connecticut Judicial Branch website This web page has many external links to valuable resources. Please view our Linkage Policy for more information.

See Also: Law About Living Wills

Research Guides

  Connecticut General Statutes

OLR Research Reports - Office of Legislative Research:

  • Durable Power of Attorney - 2007-R-0372
    You asked (1) whether there is any state oversight of people granted durable power of attorney and (2) what sanctions might apply if a person granted this power took advantage of the grantor, for example by misappropriating his property.

  • Power of Attorney - Revocative - 2005-R-0669
    You asked how a person might revoke a power of attorney? Our office is not authorized to give legal opinions and this report should not be considered one.

  • Joint Power of Attorney - 2002-R-0758
    You asked if someone gives a power of attorney to two people in the same document, do both have to sign a deed on the principal's behalf.

  • Power of Attorney - Mental Capacity - 2002-R-0094
    You asked about the mental capacity requirements for someone who wishes to execute a power of attorney.

Useful Website

Library Materials

  Selected statutes:

Click on the link below to search the full-text of the statutes: http://search.cga.state.ct.us/dtsearch_pub_statutes.html
 

Recent Case Law

Connecticut Appellate Court:

  • AC31176 - Kindred Nursing Centers East, LLC v. Morin ("Under our common law, a power of attorney creates a formal contract of agency between the grantor and his attorney in fact. Long v. Schull, 184 Conn. 252, 256, 439 A.2d 975 (1981). Under our statutory law, this agency relationship encompasses a variety of transactions that the grantor presumptively has authorized his attorney in fact to undertake on his behalf. General Statutes § 1-42 et seq. The central issue in this case is whether, pursuant to these established legal principles, a person to whom a resident of a nursing home has given a power of attorney has a duty to assist the nursing home in securing the continuation of the resident’s eligibility for medicaid financing.")

 

Connecticut Law by Subject